CNN “UpWave” article: 10 ways to keep your diet GMO-free

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This article comes from the website unwave, a new Turner Corporation venture that proudly claims to provide “a distinctive opportunity for Turner to leverage our vast branding and content expertise to create business opportunities with advertisers and consumers in a high-growth, high-impact business segment.” In short, it’s slick deceptive internet advertising for the lucrative health and wellness industry, based on the unqualified, hopelessly unreliable writings of Jeffrey Smith ( see academicsreview.org/reviewed-content/genetic-roulette/ ) and the opinions of the “American Academy of Environmental Medicine.” This latter organisation is absent from the list of regular medical specialities provided at the American Board of Medical Specialies. www.abms.org/Who_We_Help/Physicians/specialties.aspx . 

Images on the CNN website version of the article are accompanied by series of cleverly deceptive captions. For instance they mention some countries ban GM crops, but these are political decisions (in France as part of a deal to protect their energy industry). They did not involve a valid food safety argument.

Conclusion: Gossip and whispering about GMOs is not the basis of good health advice.

Full article here:

edition.cnn.com/2014/03/25/health/upwave-gmo-free-diet/

Filed Under: Grading Science Pending

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